Linking texts-in response to Autumnsky

For beginner and low intermediate learners it is beneficial to repeatedly listen and read the same content. This helps to train the mind to process a new language. The familiarity of the content helps to ingrain the flow and intonation of the new language. This kind of practice will improve the learner’s reading skill and speed.

However, for the higher intermediate and more advanced learners, acquiring more vocabulary becomes the main task. In this case it is important to read more extensively. In fact, in The Linguist system, if the learners want to maintain their target number of saved words and phrases, they need to cover a lot of material.

Doing as Autumnsky suggests in the note below, that is concentrating on a specific area of interest, is an excellent strategy. This will ensure that new words and phrases reoccur often, facilitating learning. This is another form of linking, so important in language learning. Using the Internet, it is easy to find articles in newspapers or elsewhere that are about a narrow subject. It might be international finance, or soccer, or cooking. If learners stay focused on that subject for a while, the articles are linked together, so to speak. As a result the vocabulary used will be “linked” because similar words and expressions occur often. This will make them easier to learn.

I nevertheless recommend that when advanced learners find texts where the content and voice are pleasing and interesting, they occasionally go back to repetitively listening to these, if they want to work on developing more natural phrasing and pronunciation.

The distinctions between the intensive strategy of the lower intermediate learner and the extensive strategy of the advanced learner are not hard and fast. The lower intermediate learner can, from time to time, do some extensive study, and the advanced learner benefits from occasional intensive or repetitive study. Variety is the spice of life, as they say.

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